• Apertures

    APERTURES

    2017, Birch plywood, glue, silver trombone mouthpiece, silver tuba mouthpiece, clear latex balloons, aluminum tubes, epoxy paint, plastic tube, pine lumber. Aperture no.01: 48 x 20 x 3 inches. Aperture no.02: 67 x 30 x 3 inches. Aperture no.03: 69 x 13 x 3 inches. Aperture no.04: 96 x 27 x 3 inches. Aperture no.05: 79 x 48 x 3 inches. Aperture no.6 and no.07: 48 x 48 x 3 inches

    Credits:

    Exhibition view at Ha’kibbuz Gallery, Tel Aviv.

    Curated by Yael Kainy

    Photo Credit: Ron Erde

    Video Credit: Omri Zin

    Performance during the exhibition reception: Eyal Fein

    Special thanks to Robby Nowell

  • The Periplanómenos Whistles

    From the Press Release

    The Periplanómenos Whistles is a sculptural installation that consists of three columns, each about 12 feet high. At the foot of each column is a concrete base that supports the column, and each base is of a different design that relates both to architectural staircases and platforms as well as to traditional display pedestals.
    A closer look reveals a red mouthpiece parallel to an opening, located on various heights in each column. This, along with the title of the piece, indicates that the columns are in fact functional instruments that can produce sound.

    The columns are made of Virgin Bald Cypress, an ancient tree that is between. This wood is unique because of its longevity and rot resistance, for which it was given the nickname “the wood eternal.” This characteristic is quite necessary for creating a wooden outdoor sculpture that will withstand the unforgiving Florida climate. Each column is carved out of a single trunk and painted to represent one of the species of birds that has become extinct as a result of massive deforestation in the region. This ultimately influenced and shaped the final appearance of the columns.

    “A lot of my work has some kind of possibility of ‘activity,’ you can twist it, pop it, blow into it,” Tamir said. “Usually it involves sound, but at the same time, my work is mostly meant to be seen when it is not being used. In The Periplanómenos Whistles, the sound helps me to direct the viewer’s attention to what he cannot see or touch- the inside of the columns, the inside of our body, what exists beneath our legs down in the ground or high up above our heads. Sound also travels, it doesn’t last, it moves, creating a space for a moment and then it disappears. In a way, I think it is enough to see the mouthpieces in order to hear the sound that this piece can produce. Our imagination can bring to life sounds, smells, even people, you only need the right trigger to help you do it.”

    Credits:

    The Periplanómenos Whistles by Rotem Tamir

    In collaboration with Omri Zin

    Performance by Dr. Kristen Stoner and The UF Flute studio

    With the support of the Office of the Provost, Creative Campus Committee, School of Art and Art History, University of Florida.

    And

    Sculpture Space, Inc.

    Photography by Allen Cheuvront

  • This is The Most Beautiful Dragon I Ever Saw

    Dr.Kristen Stoner experimenting with Rotem Tamir’s Instrument
  • Acoustic Cabin

    Acoustic Cabin

    An acoustic cabin built to isolate the sound of an explosion caused by a reaction between a balloon and a chemical material. The moment of the explosion cannot be anticipated in advance, so the cabin enables a “real-time” experience for the viewer. Each viewer watched the experiment take place at a specific point in time. I allowed the viewer to enter the isolated, controlled environment. During the exhibition period, the evidence of the processes remained in the cabin.

    Acoustic Cabin

    An acoustic cabin built to isolate the sound of an explosion caused by a reaction between a balloon and a chemical material. The moment of the explosion cannot be anticipated in advance, so the cabin enables a “real-time” experience for the viewer. Each viewer watched the experiment take place at a specific point in time. I allowed the viewer to enter the isolated, controlled environment. During the exhibition period, the evidence of the processes remained in the cabin.
    • Mixed media with wood, acoustic materials, audio system, balloons, chemicals.
      111.5 x 82 x 76 inches

    Documentation of shrinking process caused by a chemical reaction with a balloon

    About Rotem Tamir’s project Acoustic Cabin

    By omri zin

    In Rotem Tamir’s work there is an acoustic booth that is placed in the center of the space, and in it there are objects of a similar material nature hanging and scattered on the floor. Their form is a kind of testimony to a geometric-organic capitulation or shrinkage. Some of them resemble internal organs while others a process of disintegration, yet they remain unfamiliar in their form and material. A closer look at the objects reveals a mouth-piece of what looks to be a balloon at the edge of each one, an implication that the present state of the object is only the edge of a process. Located around the booth are speakers and recording equipment, though the only sound they transmit is the one made by the viewers entering the booth.

    Between the booth, the balloons and the recording device, a poetic landscape emerges with boundaries that are not easily defined and an order that is not easily decoded. It seems unclear whether we are roaming through a field of ruins or held up in a state of alertness, either way the main question remains unsolved: ruins of what? Alert to what? The work requires the viewer to be in an attentive state, but unlike other sound pieces, it does not provide a response, but in fact just the opposite. There is a feeling that great measures have been taken to constitute an event that lacks any happening, but merely a potential of a happening, a state of anticipation as a final state. In so, the work functions as a live metaphor and draws a linking line between the process of producing art, and viewing a work of art, positioning both on a frozen timeline, yearning for a big bang, and no way of measuring the appointed time of its occurrence.

  • This Too is an Empty Ship

    This Too is an Empty Ship

    'This too is an empty ship' created for the show 'The Alchemists', an exhibition curated by: Sally Haftel Naveh.

This text is an excerpt from her text about the show.

 Each artist studio functions as a laboratory: Tamir focuses on scientific observations, tests and experiments. Tamir relates to the artistic object as a scientific experiment, converting time in to a crucial parameter in her work. The result is an object subjected to constant tension within specific time, space and physiological conditions, constantly exposed to gradual changes – in terms of material and form. These changes neutralize the universal meaning of the object leaving place to a new personal one from the artist's private history. Tamir exhibits two new works done specially for the show: This too is an empty ship, a small replica of a 17th century clipper ship floating within a latex balloon. Using a vacuum device built specially for this action, the small replica is inserted in to the balloon, through a slow blowing and filling process with air and water. A constant danger of explosion lies down on the work. Like a kind of laboratory experiment in which the final result is unknown. This intrusive act thrills boarders and becomes a metaphor of transition and transformation which enables new surprising and exciting discoveries. The work presents a contradiction between the scientific and the calculated and the feminine and the intimate characteristically of Tamir's work. Tamir's uncontrollable desire to investigate "multiplicity", in order to understand the maximal possibilities latent in the material can be seen in the work. Tamir's works a sort of boys crafts consciously correspond with masculine leisure culture.

    This Too Is An Empty Ship

    ‘This too is an empty ship’ created for the show ‘The Alchemists’, an exhibition curated by: Sally Haftel Naveh. This text is an excerpt from her text about the show. Each artist studio functions as a laboratory: Tamir focuses on scientific observations, tests and experiments. Tamir relates to the artistic object as a scientific experiment, converting time in to a crucial parameter in her work. The result is an object subjected to constant tension within specific time, space and physiological conditions, constantly exposed to gradual changes – in terms of material and form. These changes neutralize the universal meaning of the object leaving place to a new personal one from the artist’s private history. Tamir exhibits two new works done specially for the show: This too is an empty ship, a small replica of a 17th century clipper ship floating within a latex balloon. Using a vacuum device built specially for this action, the small replica is inserted in to the balloon, through a slow blowing and filling process with air and water. A constant danger of explosion lies down on the work. Like a kind of laboratory experiment in which the final result is unknown. This intrusive act thrills boarders and becomes a metaphor of transition and transformation which enables new surprising and exciting discoveries. The work presents a contradiction between the scientific and the calculated and the feminine and the intimate characteristically of Tamir’s work. Tamir’s uncontrollable desire to investigate “multiplicity”, in order to understand the maximal possibilities latent in the material can be seen in the work. Tamir’s works a sort of boys crafts consciously correspond with masculine leisure culture.
    • This Too Is An Empty Ship

      Mixed media with latex balloon, water, and balsa wood clipper ship model.

      Dimension (in cm): 35x50x45

      (inches): 13.77×19.68×17.71

    • Photography by Hilit Kadouri

    Documentation of how the ship was inserted into the balloon

    This success, as shown in the slides above, was preceded by many failures. Actually the only time it succeeded was in the evening before the opening night. The ship, if I am not mistaken,  broke three times during previous attempts to insert it into the balloon.

    In the pictures, helping me: Omri Zin , Sally Haftel Nave and behind the camera Boaz Kadman.

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