'This too is an empty ship' created for the show 'The Alchemists', an exhibition curated by: Sally Haftel Naveh.

This text is an excerpt from her text about the show.

 Each artist studio functions as a laboratory: Tamir focuses on scientific observations, tests and experiments. Tamir relates to the artistic object as a scientific experiment, converting time in to a crucial parameter in her work. The result is an object subjected to constant tension within specific time, space and physiological conditions, constantly exposed to gradual changes – in terms of material and form. These changes neutralize the universal meaning of the object leaving place to a new personal one from the artist's private history. Tamir exhibits two new works done specially for the show: This too is an empty ship, a small replica of a 17th century clipper ship floating within a latex balloon. Using a vacuum device built specially for this action, the small replica is inserted in to the balloon, through a slow blowing and filling process with air and water. A constant danger of explosion lies down on the work. Like a kind of laboratory experiment in which the final result is unknown. This intrusive act thrills boarders and becomes a metaphor of transition and transformation which enables new surprising and exciting discoveries. The work presents a contradiction between the scientific and the calculated and the feminine and the intimate characteristically of Tamir's work. Tamir's uncontrollable desire to investigate "multiplicity", in order to understand the maximal possibilities latent in the material can be seen in the work. Tamir's works a sort of boys crafts consciously correspond with masculine leisure culture. title=This Too Is An Empty Ship

This Too Is An Empty Ship

‘This too is an empty ship’ created for the show ‘The Alchemists’, an exhibition curated by: Sally Haftel Naveh. This text is an excerpt from her text about the show. Each artist studio functions as a laboratory: Tamir focuses on scientific observations, tests and experiments. Tamir relates to the artistic object as a scientific experiment, converting time in to a crucial parameter in her work. The result is an object subjected to constant tension within specific time, space and physiological conditions, constantly exposed to gradual changes – in terms of material and form. These changes neutralize the universal meaning of the object leaving place to a new personal one from the artist’s private history. Tamir exhibits two new works done specially for the show: This too is an empty ship, a small replica of a 17th century clipper ship floating within a latex balloon. Using a vacuum device built specially for this action, the small replica is inserted in to the balloon, through a slow blowing and filling process with air and water. A constant danger of explosion lies down on the work. Like a kind of laboratory experiment in which the final result is unknown. This intrusive act thrills boarders and becomes a metaphor of transition and transformation which enables new surprising and exciting discoveries. The work presents a contradiction between the scientific and the calculated and the feminine and the intimate characteristically of Tamir’s work. Tamir’s uncontrollable desire to investigate “multiplicity”, in order to understand the maximal possibilities latent in the material can be seen in the work. Tamir’s works a sort of boys crafts consciously correspond with masculine leisure culture.
  • This Too Is An Empty Ship

    Mixed media with latex balloon, water, and balsa wood clipper ship model.

    Dimension (in cm): 35x50x45

    (inches): 13.77×19.68×17.71

  • Photography by Hilit Kadouri

Documentation of how the ship was inserted into the balloon

This success, as shown in the slides above, was preceded by many failures. Actually the only time it succeeded was in the evening before the opening night. The ship, if I am not mistaken,  broke three times during previous attempts to insert it into the balloon.

In the pictures, helping me: Omri Zin , Sally Haftel Nave and behind the camera Boaz Kadman.